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Haris Doukas believes that some people are disturbed by the efforts he is making

Haris Doukas believes that some people are disturbed by the efforts he is making

Doukas criticizes Costas Bakoyannis and other government officials who opposed his decision to run for the PASOK presidency as Athens mayor. He accuses Bakoyannis of being fixated on him and suggests that Bakoyannis may be seeking power over Athens. Doukas stresses that despite these challenges, important municipal issues have been discussed at length and highlights the ongoing transformation of Athens.

On Parapolitika 90.1 FM, Doukas claims: “Athens is experiencing profound changes that are visible to all. We are not only dealing with immediate problems, but are also implementing structural reforms – be it in building heights, metro operations to speed up the completion of the square, or tackling overtourism and inequality in municipal revenues.”

Doukas reflects on the paradox of his candidacy within PASOK and compares it to previous scenarios involving other political figures. He expresses his unease with the resistance he faces, stating: “I find the efforts I am making disturbing.” He emphasizes his proactive approach as Athens mayor, noting: “I cannot sit idly by and wait for state support while neglecting decentralization, accountability or advocating for fairer, more robust modernization efforts.”

Doukas highlights his cooperative style of government and highlights his team’s initiatives, such as the establishment of an office to combat energy poverty and the installation of solar panels in schools. He stresses the urgency of these efforts and calls on PASOK to lead a transformative change towards a fairer socioeconomic production model.

“I make a loud appeal to all democratic and progressive citizens to allow PASOK to resume its role as the cornerstone of democratic unity and to develop a coherent vision of government,” stresses Doukas. In response to questions about Anna Diamantopoulou’s possible return to PASOK, he welcomes different perspectives and calls for comprehensive dialogue and ethical behavior within the party.

Doukas avoids speculation about alliances with the centre-left camp and possible meetings with Kasselakis, explaining: “The dialogue should not be limited to meetings behind closed doors with politicians; it must also resonate at the grassroots level.”